Adya Connector for Slack

With Adya, enterprises can manage and secure data exposed out of Slack and track dangerous third party apps installed on Slack.

Use Cases

  • Employees have shared documents on Slack and marked them publicly accessible. Administrators would like visibility into publicly exposed documents and take action to limit exposure
  • External users have access to company Slack channels. Administrators would like to know which external users have access and remove them
  • Employees have been installing Slack apps and giving these apps the authority to access Slack channels and read messages. Admins would like to know which Slack apps are installed so they can remove them

Connecting to Slack

Once Adya has been installed (either from the G Suite marketplace or directly from https://app.adya.io/), go to the data sources page and scan your Slack account. You will need to be the Slack administrator to do that. As part of the install, the Adya app will need to authorize several scopes to Slack.

Working with Slack documents

Figure 1 : Scanning Slack account from Adya and authorizing scopes

One this is done, you can “Go to dashboard” for next steps

Dashboard overview

The dashboard shows a combined view of all scanned connectors. For example, if G Suite and Slack have both been scanned, the charts and reports on the dashboard are the merged data from both

Scanning Slack account from Adya and authorizing scopes

Figure 2 – The Adya dashboard merging data from all connectors

The following information is displayed on the dashboard (combined data for all connectors)

  • The total number of files, folders, users and groups
  • Pie-chart showing number of shared documents including:
    • Number of documents shared publicly (in red)
    • Number of documents shared with everyone in the company (in blue)
    • Number of documents shared with at least one person outside the company (in yellow)
    • Number of documents shared with anyone in the world that has access to the document link (in orange)
  • Pie-chart showing number of third party apps installed in the company classified by degree of risk
  • File types of the externally shared documents
  • List of external users who have access to one or more documents
  • List of internal users who have exposed the most documents externally

Each of these widgets can be clicked to get the full report which can then be filtered by connector – either Slack or G Suite in the example above

Documents

The Adya dashboard merging data from all connectors

Figure 3 – Working with Slack documents
  • Lists all the documents from which the user can filter by
    • Source – choose “Slack” to see documents shared on Slack
    • Exposure Type – choose “External” to only list the documents shared outside the company
    • Name, Type, Parent Folder, Owner, Modified date
  • Clicking on any file takes you to the details page from which actions can be taken
    • For documents shared externally on Slack, you can remove all external access

Users

Working with Slack users

Figure 4 – Working with Slack users
  • Lists all the users from which the user can filter by
    • Source – choose “Slack” to see documents shared on Slack
    • Type – External, Internal, Trusted
    • Name, Email
  • Clicking on any user takes you to the details page from which actions can be taken. The possible actions on an user are
    • Internal user -> make all documents owned by that user inaccessible by external users
    • External user -> Remove that external user from company channels

Apps

Working with Slack apps

Figure 5 – Working with Slack apps
  • Clicking on Apps takes you to the list of third party apps installed – both for G Suite and for Slack. The color coding – red, yellow, blue – denotes the riskiness of the installed app
  • Click on a third party apps installed on Slack provides more details – the scopes that have been granted and the users who have installed it.